Population density

Housing development250,404

Tim De Chant runs a blog that, as of yesterday, celebrated its first anniversary.  The blog – Per Square Mile – focuses on what I find to be an incredibly interesting topic: population density.  Much like yesterday’s post about the Dencity project by Fathom, Tim’s blog explores the phenomena associated with how and why human beings come to be co-domiciled in areas of relatively high density versus those of relatively low density.   Continue reading

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Metropolitan might

Dencity map

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As Americans we place a lot of value on our wide open spaces and tend to ascribe values such as liberty and freedom to our ability to move around throughout this great country of ours.  We also marvel at our cities as centers of commerce, culture, and wealth – viewing them as icons of progress.   Continue reading

World population milestone

7 billion

7 billion (7,000,000,000)

The number of people on Earth topped the 7 billion mark today according to the United Nations Population Fund.  The 6 billion mark was crossed in 1999 and it took the entirety of history until approximately 1804 to reach the 1 billion population figure.  Different projections have the figure reaching between 8 billion and 10.5 billion by 2050, although if the population growth over the past decade were to be used as the basis for future growth – the global population would be between 12 and 13 billion by 2050 and between 18 and 20 billion by 2100. Continue reading

7 billion lives

7 Billion ActionsIf there’s one thing that can be said about this highly connected world that we – as members of the “developed countries” – live in it is that technology has afforded us the ability to “shrink” the planet.  As recently as 20 years ago a comparatively small number of people had email addresses or used the Internet and the Web as we know it was non-existent.  If you wanted knowledge you went to a library and if you were in search of news you could pick up a newspaper or watch your local newscast.  Today there are seemingly limitless options for understanding what is going on in far flung places like Tuvalu, Malta, or Palau.  Additionally, we have a higher degree of exposure to the terrible plights that face many people in the “developing countries” such as civil war, drought, famine, and disease. Continue reading