Class conflict

Occupy Wall Street

66%

The Pew Research Center recently announced the results from a public perception survey focused on the class conflict that is emerging in the U.S. due to the widening gap between the wealthy and the poor.  According to the survey, 66% of the 2,048 adult respondents believe there are “strong” or “very strong” conflicts between America’s top 1% – who saw their incomes rise 275% between 1979 and 2007 – and the remaining 99%.   Continue reading

Population density

Housing development250,404

Tim De Chant runs a blog that, as of yesterday, celebrated its first anniversary.  The blog – Per Square Mile – focuses on what I find to be an incredibly interesting topic: population density.  Much like yesterday’s post about the Dencity project by Fathom, Tim’s blog explores the phenomena associated with how and why human beings come to be co-domiciled in areas of relatively high density versus those of relatively low density.   Continue reading

Metropolitan might

Dencity map

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As Americans we place a lot of value on our wide open spaces and tend to ascribe values such as liberty and freedom to our ability to move around throughout this great country of ours.  We also marvel at our cities as centers of commerce, culture, and wealth – viewing them as icons of progress.   Continue reading

Kiva

$271,348,025

I’ll admit it right up front.  I am a huge fan of Kiva Microfunds (commonly known as Kiva) and have been a lender there for a number of years.   Continue reading

Google’s Zeitgeist 2011: Year In Review

I know this is a shameless promotion for Google’s portfolio of search, social, local, mobile, etc. services but you have to admit it is a great video.  It is hard to believe that 2011 is almost over and looking back at all of the amazing, wonderful, and tragic things that have happened in twelve short months – it is a powerful reminder of what an incredible time in which we are living.   Continue reading

Global food production

Food66%

According to a snappy new video developed by the World Wildlife Fund, roughly one-third of the world’s landmass is currently being used to produce food to feed the more than 7 billion occupants (some significantly better than others). By 2050 this number is supposed to double (66%) and with it come a number of challenges, not the least of which is the harsh reality that we simply might not have enough non-urbanized, arable land to support the population based on current food production techniques and technologies.

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Kenneth Rogoff is an undeniable brain but where are the recommendations?

Aside